voa慢速英语:Four More People Who Are Making a Difference

发表时间:2008-11-26内容来源:VOA英语学习网

VOICE ONE:

I'm Steve Ember.


VOICE TWO:

And I'm Barbara Klein with EXPLORATIONS in VOA special english. Today we tell about four individuals who are making a difference. Each person is working to make the world a better place.

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VOICE ONE:

George Schaller helped establish the modern wildlife conservation movement


American biologist George Schaller helped to create the modern wildlife conservation movement. He has spent his life studying wild animals in more than twenty-five countries. Those animals have included mountain gorillas, snow leopards, alligators and caribou.

This year, Mister Schaller received the Indianapolis Prize -- the world's top award for animal protection and conservation. The prize is worth one hundred thousand dollars.

Mister Schaller's first major interest was mountain gorillas. In nineteen fifty-nine, he moved to Central Africa to live in the wild with the animals and observe their behavior. Little was known about mountain gorillas in the wild until his book "The Mountain Gorilla" was published in nineteen sixty-three.


GEORGE SCHALLER: "The biggest task was to be able to observe the animals so they don't run away. So, you slowly get them used to you until they see: 'Oh, there's that Schaller again,' and forget it, and they go on with their normal life. And that's the way you want it."

VOICE TWO:

That was the beginning of a lifetime of discoveries. In the nineteen seventies, George Schaller became one of two westerners to observe a snow leopard in Nepal. These animals had not been seen by foreigners in almost thirty years.

In nineteen eighty-eight, he and his wife were the first westerners permitted in China's Chang Tang area to study giant pandas. Six years later, he and another biologist discovered a new species of goat in Laos.


VOICE ONE:

Yet Mister Schaller says the pleasure of studying animals is not his main interest. He says guaranteeing their survival is most important. He says our whole civilization depends on the environment – on clean air, water, soil and food. And, he says, there is not much hope unless communities start fighting for a healthier environment.

VOICE TWO:

Recently, the Indianapolis Zoo presented the Indianapolis Prize to Mister Schaller for his conservation efforts. The zoo's president, Michael Crowther, called him, "the father of conservation biology." He also said there are generations of conservationists now who grew up learning about the subject from George Schaller.

Mister Schaller said he will use the prize money to train local conservationists around the world. He said: "And so, you leave something behind that will be valuable, long after everyone's forgotten me."

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VOICE ONE:

The United Nations estimates that more than one hundred million people around the world are homeless. Another one billion people lack good homes. In the United States, between two million and three million people have not had a home for more than a year. One American is attempting to solve this problem with soccer, the game called football in other countries.

VOICE TWO:


Last summer, two teams of four players each battled for control of a small, red and white soccer ball in Washington, D.C. More than one hundred players were in the city to take part in a competition. They share one thing in common: they all have been homeless. Lawrence Cann brought these players together to compete in the Homeless USA Cup.

Volunteers work with and train the players throughout the year. The volunteers come from homeless shelters, drug treatment and community centers. Almost fifty countries have similar programs. All of the teams will compete in December at the Homeless World Cup in Australia.


VOICE ONE:

Lawrence Cann works at a community center in North Carolina. He has played soccer his whole life and loves the sport. Four years ago, he started a non-profit group, Street Soccer USA, as a program for homeless people. Mister Cann says his group builds relationships with people. And once they are living in homes, the group builds on that relationship.


VOICE TWO:

Lawrence Cann says his program helps to end popular but false ideas about homelessness. He says that nobody chooses to be homeless. He says homelessness is a social issue, and everyone has a responsibility for it.

Mister Cann says about seven hundred homeless men and women were on the soccer fields this year. He says about seventy-five percent of them will make positive changes in their lives. Many will continue their education or get permanent jobs. Lawrence Cann's goal is to get ten thousand homeless people involved in the program during the next five years.

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VOICE ONE:


Another American, Marshall Bailly, started a group that helps university students in Africa and Asia to create community service projects. Mister Bailly is making a difference through development projects in Namibia, Nigeria and the Philippines.

The young man first went to Namibia five years ago while he was a student at American University in Washington, D.C. His goal was to help university students improve their communities.


At the age of twenty, he developed a leadership program with the University of Namibia to teach important skills to social activists. These include how to raise money and keep financial records.


VOICE TWO:

This trip to Namibia marked the birth of "Leadership Initiatives," the international development organization Mister Bailly started. Through American University, he had visited China, Japan, Angola, Botswana and Nigeria. He had seen how these countries were developing and how he could take part in their development. He discovered that he could use his studies to establish a class for students in Namibia.

来自:VOA英语网 文章地址: http://www.tingvoa.com/html/20081126/100.html